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Monthly Archives: October 2012

Hope is Not Lost, It's Wearable

For pediatric cancer patients, hope is not lost. Student entrepreneur Jessica Ekstrom has founded Headbands of Hope to help fund cancer research and spread hope to all girls. For every headband purchased, one is given to a girl with cancer and $1 is donated to the St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund life-saving childhood cancer research.


Educating for Energy Security

Political Science Prof Bill Boettcher gives students a rigorous education about a pressing challenge of the 21st century: energy security. This spring, his students' research took them out of the classroom and into a simulated session where they acted the parts of world energy powers, to the halls of the Pentagon, and beyond. The students' experiences were made possible in part by donations to the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.


CHASS Alumnus Has a Heart for the Underdogs

Jon Powell never considered going to law school until his NC State communication professor, Dr. Ed Funkhouser, mentioned that one of his other communication students was taking that route. Today, Powell directs Campbell Law School's Juvenile Justice Project.


Parenting is More Important Than Schools to Academic Achievement

New research from NC State University sociologist Toby Parcel and others finds that parental involvement is a more significant factor in a child’s academic performance than the qualities of the school itself. “Our study shows that parents need to be aware of how important they are, and invest time in their children – checking homework, attending school events and letting kids know school is important,” says Parcel, who co-authored a paper on the work. “That’s where the payoff is.”


Money Key Factor in Driving Med Students from Primary Care Careers

Primary care physicians are at the heart of health care in the United States, and are often the first to diagnose patients and ensure those patients receive the care they need. But NC State psychologist Lori Foster Thompson and other researchers have found that many students are choosing to pass up a career in primary care because those physicians make substantially less money than specialists, such as dermatologists or radiologists.