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Tag Archives: Faculty

Preparing the Next Generation of Mental Health Workers

Too many young people are at risk for mental health and substance abuse issues. And not enough trained professionals are there to help them, especially in rural areas. With a $1.1M grant, NC State’s Department of Social Work is launching a new workforce program to recruit and train the next generation of mental health professionals who work with young adults.


Seeking Global Strategic Partners: Travels to Uganda

NC State seeks out strategic partners around the globe. That quest took Dean Jeff Braden to Uganda recently, where he led a university delegation to explore the potential for partnerships between Makarere University, the Kingdom of Buganda, The Aids Support Organization (TASO), and the Maamma Watali Project. His goal was to assess the resources, capabilities and needs there in order to advise NC State's Office of International Affairs on whether or how to proceed in developing these international partnerships.


Celebrating the Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies

NC State recently celebrated an exceptionally generous $8.1 million gift to endow the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Representing the largest single gift in the history of the college, the Khayrallahs are creating the first privately endowed center at NC State, and the world’s first center on Lebanese culture and history outside of Lebanon. Enjoy pictures from the event where the gift was announced.


Tony Hale's Chicken Tale

You may know Emmy-award winning actor Tony Hale as Buster Bluth on Arrested Development, or as Gary Walsh, the Veep's personal aide. Less well known but equally important title roles include Children's Book Author, and Brother. Hale is the brother of Kim Andreaus, the field placement supervisor for the NC State Department of Social Work's MSW program. It is in [...]


Childhood Mentors Boost Career Success

New research from NC State's Department of Sociology and Anthropology finds that young people who have had mentors are more likely to find work early in their careers that gives them more responsibility and autonomy – ultimately putting them on a path to more financially and personally rewarding careers.