Andrew Taylor

Dec 21, 2016  |  Wall Street Journal

North Carolina Legislature Adjourns Without Repealing Transgender Bathroom Law

A bipartisan agreement to repeal North Carolina’s transgender bathroom law fell apart Wednesday, after Republican legislative leaders required a late addendum of a six-month “cooling-off” period for local policies that Democrats said was a violation of a hard-fought deal. Andrew Taylor, political science, featured.

Sep 22, 2016  |  WRAL News

Candidates spend millions over battle for NC’s governor’s mansion

Candidates are spending millions over the battle for North Carolina's governor's mansion. Andrew Taylor, political science, featured.

Aug 24, 2016  |  US News and World Report

Seeing Red in North Carolina

Many North Carolinians think the Republican party has taken the state too far to the right. The presidential race and many statewide races are currently within the margin of error in this battleground state. Andy Taylor, political science, featured.

Jul 26, 2016  |  USA Today

Donald Trump Tries to Hold Tar Heel State

According to an NC State political scientist, it’s almost inconceivable to think that a Republican can win the White House while losing North Carolina. Andy Taylor, School of Public and International Affairs, featured.

Jul 6, 2016  |  Asheboro Courier Tribune

Clinton or Trump? North Carolina’s Suburbs Could Be A Key In November

Nobody can help Hillary Clinton with black voters better than Barack Obama. Andrew Taylor, political science, featured

Jan 12, 2016  |  Slate Magazine

Could Abortion Become a Wedge Issue in the South’s Last Semi-Swing State?

Andrew Taylor, political science, featured. Abortion will remain “a fundraising issue and a base issue more than anything else” in 2016—one that both Republicans and Democrats can use to rile a relatively small share of voters.

Nov 4, 2015

Lawmakers, political scientists to talk gerrymandering during Holtzman forum

Gerrymandering — the practice of drawing electoral districts to advantage one political party over another — will be the topic of discussion when state lawmakers, political scientists and demographers gather on Nov. 11 for the annual Abe Holtzman Public Policy Forum.